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August 30th, 2017 at 11:07 am

Bryant’s Maritime Blog – 30 August 2017

Headlines:

USCG – Hurricane Harvey response snapshot;

Houston – SAR efforts continue;

USCG – REC Houston closed due to hurricane;

USCG – ferry jumper fined;

CTAC – meeting on 3-5 October;

FMC – Hurricane Harvey commercial disputes;

FMC – Hurricane Harvey passenger disputes;

UK – guidance re cargo fumigation;

Sinking of SS Metis – 30 August 1872; and

Norm Paulhus – 1950-2017.

August 30, 2017

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Note: This blog is one section of the Bryant’s Maritime Consulting website. Visit the site for more extensive maritime regulatory information. Individual concerns may be addressed by retaining Dennis Bryant directly. Much of the highlighted text in this newsletter constitutes links to Internet sites providing more detailed information. Links on this page may be in PDF format, requiring use of Adobe Acrobat Reader. Comments on these postings are encouraged and may be made by clicking the envelope that appears at the end of each posting. Be aware that the daily blog entry is a single posting, even though it contains a number of individual items. ‘Getting lucky’ means walking into a room and remembering why I’m there.

USCG – Hurricane Harvey response snapshot

clip_image004 The US Coast Guard issued a news release providing a Hurricane Harvey response snapshot. As of noon, 29 August, the Coast Guard had rescued more than 3,175 persons and 113 pets. There are nearly 2,000 USCG personnel involved in response efforts. They are operating 20 helicopters, one fixed wing aircraft, and 20 shallow-draft response craft (punts). The ports of Houston, Texas City, Galveston, Freeport, and Corpus Christi remain closed. (8/29/17) [https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/USDHSCG/bulletins/1b3e0e1].

Houston – SAR efforts continue

clip_image004[1] The US Coast Guard issued a news release stating that its air crews and punt teams have rescued in excess of 3,600 people from flooded homes and streets in the Houston area. (8/29/17) [https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/USDHSCG/bulletins/1b3cdd9].

USCG – REC Houston closed due to hurricane

clip_image004[2] The USCG National Maritime Center (NMC) issued a notice stating that the Regional Exam Center in Houston is closed until further notice due to Hurricane Harvey. Mariners should not fax or mail applications to REC Houston until it reopens. Applications may be sent to another REC. (8/28/17) [http://www.dco.uscg.mil/Portals/9/NMC/pdfs/rec/rec_houston_closure_082817.pdf].

USCG – ferry jumper fined

clip_image005 The US Coast Guard issued a news release stating that a notice of violation for a $2,500 civil penalty to the individual who jumped off a Casco Bay Lines vessel while it was underway in the Fore River at Portland, Maine last month. (8/29/17) [https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/USDHSCG/bulletins/1b3d66f].

CTAC – meeting on 3-5 October

clip_image005[1] The Chemical Transportation Advisory Committee (CTAC), sponsored by the US Coast Guard, will meet in Washington, DC on 3-5 October. Topics on the agenda include safety standards for the design of vessels carrying natural gas or using natural gas as fuel and hazardous substance response plans for tank vessels and facilities. 82 Fed. Reg. 41279 (8/30/17) [https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2017-08-30/pdf/2017-18331.pdf].

FMC – Hurricane Harvey commercial disputes

clip_image007 The Federal Maritime Commission (FMC) issued a news release stating that it stands ready to assist ocean carriers and shippers involved in commercial disputes in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey. (8/29/17) [https://www.fmc.gov/fmc_assistance_shippers_carriers_harvey/].

FMC – Hurricane Harvey passenger disputes

clip_image008 The Federal Maritime Commission (FMC) issued a news release stating that it is available, within its limited authority, to assist cruise line passengers in disputes with the passenger vessel operators regarding itinerary changes and cancellations resulting from Hurricane Harvey. (8/29/17) [https://www.fmc.gov/notice_to_passengers_hurricane_harvey/].

UK – guidance re cargo fumigation

clip_image010 The UK Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) issued guidance to highlight the importance of fumigation being undertaken by professionally trained personnel in line with guidance published by the Health and Safety Executive and the International Maritime Organization.  MGN 576 (M) (8/26/17) [https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/639924/MGN_576.pdf].

Sinking of SS Metis – 30 August 1872

clip_image012 clip_image014 During a rainstorm, the passenger vessel SS Metis, with approximately 242 passengers and crew on board collided with the schooner Nettie Cushing at about 4 a.m. on 30 August 1872 in Long Island Sound near Watch Hill, Rhode Island. Metis, en route from New York to Providence, was holed below the waterline and flooded quickly. Passengers were assembled and many boarded lifeboats. The captain and the agent of the Providence and New York Steamship Line refused to board lifeboats and remained in the pilot house. They were among the forty persons still alive when the vessel’s upper works washed ashore. The Revenue Cutter Moccasin, Captain David Ritchie commanding, rushed to the scene, rescuing 45 persons and recovering 17 bodies. It is estimated that 130 persons died in the sinking. Captain Ritchie and the officers and men of Moccasin received the formal Thanks of Congress by means of a Resolution adopted on 24 January 1873. A US Life-Saving Station was built at Watch Hill in 1879, adjacent to the Lighthouse. There was no marine insurance on Metis. Suits were brought against the shipowner, including one by a passenger stating that he bought his $3 ticket and incurred injuries and expenses due to the sinking – he demanded $20,000 damages. The owners filed a petition in federal court seeking exoneration from and limitation of liability.

Norm Paulhus, Jr. – 1950-2017

clip_image016 Norm Paulhus, Jr. passed on 25 August after a long illness. Our thoughts and sincere sympathy are with his family. He never served in the Coast Guard, but was one of the best champions the Coast Guard ever had and such a special friend to so many of us. For years he attended changes of command and retirement ceremonies around the nation.  He also attended many of our personal celebrations.   Norm made each of these events more special with his presents and was expert in documenting and gifting us with his amazing photos.  If a Coast Guard member was mentioned by name in newspaper article, no matter how obscure, you could count on Norm to find the article and forward it to his many correspondents.  Norm’s passing will be very deeply felt by all of us who knew him.  No one could have had a better friend.

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Dennis L. Bryant

Bryant’s Maritime Consulting

4845 SW 91st Way
Gainesville, FL 32608-8135

USA

1-352-692-5493
dennis.l.bryant@gmail.com

http://brymar-consulting.com

© Dennis L. Bryant – August 2017

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