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December 4th, 2017 at 11:15 am

Bryant’s Maritime Blog – 4 December 2017

Headlines:

USCG – international marine casualty investigations;

USCG – BWMS type approval process;

USCG – Arctic Domain Awareness Center meeting;

USCG – MU Guam reopens;

NTSB – USCG cutter/tugboat collision;

NTSB – ISO Marine Accident Investigators;

CDC – Vessel Sanitation Program;

USACE – Carquinez Strait EIS;

Panama Canal – Neopanamax booking slots; and

SV Mary Celeste – 4 December 1872.

December 4, 2017

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Note: This blog is one section of the Bryant’s Maritime Consulting website. Visit the site for more extensive maritime regulatory information. Individual concerns may be addressed by retaining Dennis Bryant directly. Much of the highlighted text in this newsletter constitutes links to Internet sites providing more detailed information. Links on this page may be in PDF format, requiring use of Adobe Acrobat Reader. Comments on these postings are encouraged and may be made by clicking the envelope that appears at the end of each posting. Be aware that the daily blog entry is a single posting, even though it contains a number of individual items. The Ship of Theseus sails forever.

USCG – international marine casualty investigations

clip_image004 The US Coast Guard issued a Navigation and Vessel Inspection Circular (NVIC) publishing policy and guidance for the coordination and cooperation of marine casualty investigations with other substantially interested States consistent with the generally recognized practices and procedures of international law. NVIC 05-17 (12/1/17) [http://www.dco.uscg.mil/Portals/9/DCO%20Documents/5p/5ps/NVIC/2017/NVIC_5-17.pdf].

USCG – BWMS type approval process

clip_image004[1] The US Coast Guard issued a bulletin providing updated information regarding the ballast water management system (BWMS) type approval process. (11/30/17) [http://mariners.coastguard.dodlive.mil/2017/11/29/11292017-ballast-water-series-part-3-coast-guard-bwms-type-approval-program-update/].

USCG – Arctic Domain Awareness Center meeting

clip_image005 The US Coast Guard issued a news release stating that on 28-29 November it hosted an Arctic Domain Awareness Center (ADAC) meeting in Washington, DC. (11/30/17) [https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/USDHSCG/bulletins/1c8e4a8].

USCG – MU Guam reopens

clip_image006 The USCG National Maritime Center (NMC) issued a bulletin announcing that Monitoring Unit (MU) Guam will reopen on 4 December. (12/1/17) [http://www.dco.uscg.mil/Portals/9/NMC/pdfs/rec/mu_guam_open.pdf].

NTSB – USCG cutter/tugboat collision

clip_image008 The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) issued the report of its investigation of the 18 April 2017 collision involving the Panama-flagged tugboat Cerro Santiago and the US Coast Guard cutter Tampa in Miraflores Lake, Panama Canal. Both vessels were proceeding northbound at the time, with Tampa ahead of the tugboat. Although the tugboat was not damaged, the cutter sustained $170,018 in damage to the stern as well as to various systems in the steering gear room. There were no injuries, nor was there any report of pollution. The probable cause of the collision between the tugboat Cerro Santiago and the US Coast Guard cutter Tampa was the failure of the master of the Cerro Santiago to maintain a vigilant watch due to fatigue. MAB 17/37 (11/30/17) [https://www.ntsb.gov/investigations/AccidentReports/Reports/MAB1737.pdf].

NTSB – ISO Marine Accident Investigators

clip_image009 The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) posted a Vacancy Announcement stating that it seeks two qualified individuals for the position of Marine Accident Investigator (Nautical). Applications must be received by 15 December. (12/1/17) [https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/485679400]. Note: This item was first brought to my attention by my good friend Richard Hiscock of Off Soundings.

CDC – Vessel Sanitation Program

clip_image011 The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) seeks comments on the draft Vessel Sanitation Program (VSP) Operations Manual and VSP Construction Guidelines. Comments must be submitted by 2 February 2018. 82 Fed. Reg. 57272 (12/4/17) [https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2017-12-04/pdf/2017-25955.pdf].

USACE – Carquinez Strait EIS

clip_image013 The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) issued a notice stating that it intends to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) to evaluate the efficiency of the movement of goods along the existing deep-draft navigation route extending from the Golden Gate, through San Pablo Bay and Carquinez Strait, to deep-draft facilities at Avon, California. Comments must be submitted within 30 days. 82 Fed. Reg. 57237 (12/4/17) [https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2017-12-04/pdf/2017-26051.pdf].

Panama Canal – Neopanamax booking slots

clip_image015 The Panama Canal Authority (ACP) issued a press release announcing that the number of daily booking slots available for Neopanamax vessels has been increased from six to seven. (11/30/17) [https://www.pancanal.com/eng/pr/press-releases/2017/11/30/pr639.html].

SV Mary Celeste – 4 December 1872

clip_image017 On 4 December 1872, the US brigantine Mary Celeste, en route from New York to Genoa, was discovered abandoned and deserted off the Azores Islands in a disheveled but seaworthy condition, with no obvious signs of sudden catastrophe. The final entry in the log, dated ten days previously, was a routine statement of the ship’s position. There were ample provisions on board, and the cargo was intact. None of those who had been on board were seen or heard from again. At the subsequent salvage hearings in Gibraltar, the court’s officers found no evidence of conspiracy or foul play. Over time the story has been distorted by false detail and fanciful explanations, including attacks by giant squid and paranormal intervention. The mystery has been recounted and dramatized in documentaries, novels, plays and films, and the name of the ship has become synonymous with unexplained desertion. After the Gibraltar hearings, Mary Celeste continued in service under new owners until, in 1885, the ship was wrecked off the coast of Haiti in an attempted insurance fraud.

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Dennis L. Bryant

Bryant’s Maritime Consulting

4845 SW 91st Way
Gainesville, FL 32608-8135

USA

1-352-692-5493
dennis.l.bryant@gmail.com

http://brymar-consulting.com

© Dennis L. Bryant – December 2017

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    logo11 Alternate Compliance Program

    In the December 2017 edition of Maritime Reporter and Engineering News, you can find my article entitled "Alternate Compliance Program". The article discusses the US Coast Guard program for delegating to authorized classification societies the authority to perform specific inspections on US-flag vessels on its behalf. The USCG investigation into the tragic loss of the cargo ship El Faro identified various shortcomings in this program. Efforts should be undertaken to get it back on track.