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Bryant's Maritime Consulting

October 12th, 2018 at 10:53 am

Bryant’s Maritime Blog – 12 October 2018

Headlines:

EPA – 2013 VGP continued indefinitely;

USCG – Alternative Compliance Program; and

USCG – Maritime Commerce Strategic Outlook.

October 12, 2018

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EPA – 2013 VGP continued indefinitely

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The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued an Update stating that the 2013 Vessel General Permit (VGP) will not be reissued prior to its 18 December 2018 expiration date, but will be administratively continued and remain in effect until a new permit is issued. Owners and operators of vessels operating under the administratively continued permit are expected to comply with the terms and conditions of that permit until the new permit is issued and enters into effect. (10/10/18) [https://www.epa.gov/npdes/vessels-vgp].

USCG – Alternative Compliance Program

clip_image006 The US Coast Guard issued Change 3 to Navigation and Vessel Inspection Circular (NVIC) 02-95, the Alternative Compliance Program (ACP). The primary purpose of the change is to align the ACP with applicable IMO instruments. Additionally, the change incorporates various policies and related provisions consistent with the Commandant’s Final Action Memo on the sinking of the SS El Faro. NVIC 02-95, CH-3 (10/2/18) [https://www.dco.uscg.mil/Portals/9/DCO%20Documents/5p/5ps/NVIC/1995/n2-95ch3.pdf].

USCG – Maritime Commerce Strategic Outlook

clip_image006[1] The US Coast Guard issued its Maritime Commerce Strategic Outlook. The document outlines the Commandant’s long-term vision to support and grow maritime commerce in the United States. The three major elements of the policy are: (1) facilitation of lawful trade and travel on secure waterways; (2) modernization of aids to navigation and other mariner information systems; and (3) transformation of workforce capacity and partnerships. (10/11/18) [https://media.defense.gov/2018/Oct/05/2002049100/-1/-1/1/USCG%20MARITIME%20COMMERCE%20STRATEGIC%20OUTLOOK-RELEASABLE.PDF].

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Dennis L. Bryant

Bryant’s Maritime Consulting

4845 SW 91st Way
Gainesville, FL 32608-8135

USA

1-352-692-5493
dennis.l.bryant@gmail.com

http://brymar-consulting.com

© Dennis L. Bryant – October 2018

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    logo11 Liquefaction

    In the October 2018 edition of Maritime Reporter and Engineering News, you can find my article entitled "Liquefaction". The article discusses the shocking number of bulk carriers that have suddenly and catastrophically been lost at sea in recent years. The known or suspected cause of these tragic losses has been liquefaction of cargo. Despite efforts of the IMO, insurers, and trade associations, these losses continue. Installing a longitudinal bulkhead in each cargo hold would reduce the risk of liquefaction and the consequent loss of ships, cargo, and crews.