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December 6th, 2018 at 11:51 am

Bryant’s Maritime Blog – 6 December 2018

Headlines:

Cape Canaveral – safety zone;

USCG – MERPAC members sought;

USCG – MERMAC members sought;

USCG – inland tender fleet replacement;

EMSA – transport cybersecurity conference;

New Zealand – $400 fine for passengers with pests; and

SS Mont Blanc explosion in Halifax – 6 December 1917.

December 6, 2018

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Note: This blog is one section of the Bryant’s Maritime Consulting website. Visit the site for more extensive maritime regulatory information. Individual concerns may be addressed by retaining Dennis Bryant directly. Much of the highlighted text in this newsletter constitutes links to Internet sites providing more detailed information. Links on this page may be in PDF format, requiring use of Adobe Acrobat Reader. Comments on these postings are encouraged and may be made by clicking the envelope that appears at the end of each posting. Be aware that the daily blog entry is a single posting, even though it contains a number of individual items. The proposal is all very well in practice, but it will never work in theory.

Cape Canaveral – safety zone

clip_image004 The US Coast Guard issued a news release stating that a safety zone has been established in waters off Cape Canaveral after a SpaceX Falcon 9 landed in the water. (12/5/18) [https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/USDHSCG/bulletins/2206c5d]. Note: It appears that, after a successful launch of an ISS resupply mission, the first stage separated and landed in the ocean after losing control.

USCG – MERPAC members sought

clip_image004[1] The US Coast Guard seeks applications for membership on the Merchant Mariner Personnel Advisory Committee (MERPAC). Applications should be submitted by 4 February 2019. 83 Fed. Reg. 62876 (12/6/18) [https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2018-12-06/pdf/2018-26420.pdf].

USCG – MEDMAC members sought

clip_image004[2] The US Coast Guard seeks applications from interested individuals for membership on the Merchant Mariner Medical Advisory Committee (MEDMAC). Applications should be submitted by 4 February 2019. 83 Fed. Reg. 62844 (12/6/18) [https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2018-12-06/pdf/2018-26499.pdf].

USCG – inland tender fleet replacement

clip_image004[3] The US Coast Guard is in the early stages of a replacement program for its inland tender fleet of 35 cutters that support the service’s aids to navigation (ATON) mission in federal inland waterways. The inland tenders can also perform missions such as search and rescue (SAR); ports, waterways, and coastal security: marine safety; and marine environmental protection. [https://www.dcms.uscg.mil/Our-Organization/Assistant-Commandant-for-Acquisitions-CG-9/Programs/Surface-Programs/WCC/].

EMSA – transport cybersecurity conference

clip_image006 The European Maritime Safety Administration (EMSA) issued a press release stating that the 1st Transport Cybersecurity Conference will be held in Lisbon on 23 January 2019. (12/5/18) [http://www.emsa.europa.eu/emsa-homepage/2-news-a-press-centre/news/3418-1st-transport-cyber-security-conference.html].

New Zealand – $400 fine for passengers with pests

clip_image008 Biosecurity New Zealand issued a media release announcing that cruise ship passengers who bring ashore foods or other items that could carry dangerous pests or diseases are now subject to a fine of $400. (12/4/18) [https://www.biosecurity.govt.nz/news-and-resources/media-releases/cruise-ship-fines-start/].

SS Mont Blanc explosion in Halifax – 6 December 1917

clip_image010 The freighter SS Mont Blanc exploded in the Halifax Narrows on 6 December 1917, following its collision with the SS Imo. The freighter was carrying military explosives and ammunition from New York to France. The crew abandoned ship after the collision, but a fire caused by the collision detonated 20 minutes later. The entire crew survived, except for one individual killed by falling debris. The explosion, though, was so powerful that it destroyed major parts of the nearby buildings and houses, killing approximately 2,000 residents in Halifax and Dartmouth. The incident is explored in depth in the book Curse of the Narrows by Laura MacDonald.

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Dennis L. Bryant

Bryant’s Maritime Consulting

4845 SW 91st Way
Gainesville, FL 32608-8135

USA

1-352-692-5493
dennis.l.bryant@gmail.com

http://brymar-consulting.com

© Dennis L. Bryant – December 2018

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    logo11 The Forward-Facing Coast Guard

    In the November 2018 edition of Maritime Reporter and Engineering News, you can find my article entitled "The Forward-Facing Coast Guard". The article discusses the recently-published Coast Guard Maritime Commerce Strategic Outlook. The document identifies three major lines of effort for meeting the service's challenges ahead: (1) facilitating lawful trade and travel on secure waterways; (2) modernizing aids to navigation and mariner information systems; and (3) transforming workforce capacity and partnerships. The Outlook goes a long way toward providing Coast Guard members and employees and those who work with or are impacted by the service with a better understanding of where this national treasure is headed.